Black stone in Kaaba


The Black Stone (Arabic: الحجر الأسود‎ al-Ḥajar al-Aswad) is the eastern cornerstone of the Kaaba, the ancient stone building toward which Muslims pray, in the center of the Grand Mosque in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. It is revered by Muslims as an Islamic relic which, according to Muslim tradition, dates back to the time of Adam and Eve.
The stone was venerated at the Kaaba in pre-Islamic pagan times. According to Islamic tradition, it was set intact into the Kaaba's wall by the Islamic prophet Muhammad in the year 605 A.D., five years before his first revelation. Since then it has been broken into a number of fragments and is now cemented into a silver frame in the side of the Kaaba. Its physical appearance is that of a fragmented dark rock, polished smooth by the hands of millions of pilgrims. Islamic tradition holds that it fell from Heaven to show Adam and Eve where to build an altar. Although it has often been described as a meteorite, this hypothesis is now uncertain.
Muslim pilgrims circle the Kaaba as part of the tawaf ritual of the hajj. Many of them try, if possible, to stop and kiss the Black Stone, emulating the kiss that Islamic tradition records that it received from Muhammad. If they cannot reach it, they point to it on each of their seven circuits around the Kaaba. (Wikipedia)

 

Black stone in Kaaba 1858-1864

Black stone in Kaaba 1858-1864

Black stone in Kaaba 1858-1864

Image source: commons.wikimedia.org

Black stone in Kaaba 1658

Black stone in Kaaba 1658

Black stone in Kaaba 1658

Image source: commons.wikimedia.org


 

Black stone

Black stone

Black stone

Image source: web.archive.org

A close up of the Blackstone on the corner of the Kaba

A close up of the Blackstone on the corner of the Kaba

A close up of the Blackstone on the corner of the Kaba

Image source: commons.wikimedia.org